Fall getaway: History / Culture

Fredericton, NB

Church and steeple in autumn

A New Brunswick gem, this capital city is rich with Loyalist history and committed to keeping it alive.

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DAY ONE
Morning and Afternoon

A full day at the Beaverbrook Art Gallery [http://beaverbrookartgallery.org/en/] may initially seem like a lot, but with their recent rebirth and renovation, and an expanded space for their permanent collection which they’re focusing on for 2018 (with a few smaller exhibitions including “Peter Coffman — Camino”), a day should just cover it. Immerse yourself in their International Collection which spans over 600 years of art work. The collection features work from some of the greatest artists throughout history including Dutch-Canadian painter Cornelius Krieghoff and American artist John Singer Sargent.

EAT. SLEEP

DAY TWO
Morning

Rich in history, Fredericton has maintained both the Guard House and the Soldier’s Barracks [http://www.tourismfredericton.ca/en/experience/the-guard-house-and-soldiers-barracks] from the 1820s, built to accommodate the British Army. The Guard House offers a look at an Orderly Room, Guard Room and Cell Block as it would have been in the 1800s, as well as on-display artifacts. And the Soldier’s Barracks are a window into three and a half-storeys of sleeping 19-to-a-room.

Afternoon

The city’s Legislative Assembly Building [http://www.tourismfredericton.ca/en/experience/legislative-assembly-building] has served as the seat of the provincial government since 1882. It boasts an impressive dome, spiral staircase and is decorated in late Victorian style with brass details and rich wood. Contact them to arrange a tour.
EAT. SLEEP

DAY THREE
Morning

Take a walk along Waterloo Row, a prestigious street along the river front, where the oldest houses are closer to the road and larger mansion-like homes sit behind their luxurious front yards. Named after the Battle of Waterloo, the area is a living museum of the city’s history.

And to catch a glimpse of the families who would have built Waterloo Row, head to The Old Public Burial Grounds. It is where many of the Loyalist families that colonized the area are buried.

Afternoon

The Christ Church Cathedral [https://cccath.ca] in Fredericton was consecrated in 1853 and designated a National Historic Site of Canada almost 150 years later. It is said to be one of the best examples of ecclesiological Gothic Revival architecture in Canada and was a leader and example in how many of the smaller churches were built in the 19th century.

UNTIL NEXT TIME.

Ottawa, ON

Ottawa morningThe nation’s capital is more than a long canal and some Beaver Tails. Take a look, way back, and explore.

 

 

 

 

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DAY ONE
Morning

In Ottawa, it’s hard not to feel the history of the nation at every turn. Focus for your first stop and visit the Canadian Museum of History [www.historymuseum.ca]. The Canadian History Hall recently celebrated its’ first anniversary and in that year, welcomed close to half a million people. History Hall is the “most comprehensive and inclusive exhibition ever created about Canada’s history,” from the beginning to today.

After the museum, take an organized Indigenous Walk [http://indigenouswalks.com] to learn about the history of the First Nation peoples in the Ottawa and Outaouais region. Take a stroll through the downtown core and see the city through a different lens. Revisit public spaces including Parliament Hill, the Byward Market and Lansdowne Park and understand the land of the Anishinabe peoples.

Afternoon

With three almost year-round tours available, The Haunted Walk(s) [https://hauntedwalk.com/ottawa-tours/] in Ottawa aim to entertain. You can choose from the Ghosts and the Gallows tour which centres on the Carleton County Jail (thought to be one of the most haunted buildings in North America), the Crime and Punishment Jail Tour which also features the Carleton Jail prominently with a focus on how prisoners lived and who the inmates were, or the Original Haunted Walk of Ottawa (April until November) which visits the Bytown Museum, the Chateau Laurier and Ottawa’s haunted high school.

EAT. SLEEP

DAY TWO
Morning and Afternoon

Take an hour drive out-of-town for the day to nearby Smith’s Falls [https://www.smithsfalls.ca]. The town dates back to the American Revolutionary War and is steeped in the history of the region.

First stop? Heritage House. A visit includes a tour of 8 period-designed rooms and a closer look at the historic stone structure, brick bake oven and two-story privy. From there, visit the UNESCO World Heritage Rideau Canal and lock stations, and imagine what life was like in 1884 when the Canadian Railroad first rolled through the area.

EAT. SLEEP

DAY THREE
Morning

Around Remembrance Day, a visit to the National War Memorial [http://www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/remembrance/memorials/canada/national] is in order. This cenotaph recognizes the sacrifices Canadian soldiers have made in the past and has been the site of Remembrance Day events and memorials since its unveiling in 1939.

A short 15-minute walk away will take you to the Bytown Museum [https://www.bytownmuseum.com], located on the Ottawa Locks along the Rideau Canal. Designed to bridge the city’s past with its present place in the community, exhibitions like “Through the Eyes of Community: 150 Years of Ottawa’s History”, on until December 23, 2018, keep locals and tourists alike interested and educated.

Afternoon

After lunch in the National Gallery of Canada’s [https://www.gallery.ca] cafe, peruse the permanent collection that houses work by Canadian sound artist Janet Cardiff, American contemporary pop artist Keith Haring and the famous “Maman”, the giant spider that lives outside of the gallery, by Louise Bourgeois. Don’t miss Anthropocene, an exhibition that highlights the impact of human activity on the Earth, featuring works by Canadian artists Edward Burtynsky, Jennifer Baichwal and Nicholas de Pencier.

UNTIL NEXT TIME.

Yukon, NWT

Fog hangs over the Yukon River and the SS Klondike riverboat, Whitehorse, Yukon Territory, CanadaGo north and be blown away by the beauty, history and rich culture Canada has yet to fully discover.

 

 

 

 

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DAY ONE
Morning

It can be a steep learning curve at the Yukon Beringia Interpretive Centre [http://www.beringia.com]. The Centre is dedicated to the preservation of First Nation’s and scientific history as it relates to the vast sub-continent called Beringia. To help them do that, the centre has dioramas of extinct ice age animals, complete skeletons and interactive displays that explain how things worked during the ice age.

Head back into the centre of the city to learn about the stories of The North at the MacBride Museum [http://macbridemuseum.com/visit]. From the characters of the gold rush, to the colonization of the First Nations, it is a must-visit culture centre.

Afternoon

A short walk from downtown is the national historic site, the S.S. Klondike [https://www.pc.gc.ca/en/lhn-nhs/yt/ssklondike]. A riverboat, it once provided a link between the Yukon and the outside world. Bringing supplies like food and blankets to the communities of Whitehorse and Dawson City, the S.S. Klondike was more than a mode of transportation of people and goods, but a key to survival.

EAT. SLEEP

DAY TWO
Morning

A short drive from the city centre is the Copperbelt Railway and Mining Museum [http://macbridemuseum.com/visit/macbride-copperbelt-mining-museum]. It’s the perfect place to learn about mining heritage, the role the railway played in the development of mining in the region, and an overall look at the history of copper mining.

Next, head over to an architectural phenomena unique to the area, log sky scrapers. In order to house the influx of military that came with the building of the Alaska Highway, Martin Berrigan had what he thought was an inspired idea. In keeping with the frontier vibe of Whitehorse, he would construct multi-level log “houses” that would still stand, and be inhabited, today.

Afternoon

Visit the Kwanlin Dün Cultural Centre located on the Yukon River, to learn about Kwanlin Dün First Nation [http://kwanlindunculturalcentre.com/visit-the-kdcc/], their culture, ancestors and way of life.

EAT. SLEEP

DAY THREE
Morning and Afternoon

Grab a car and head out of town to Haines Junction and Kluane Provincial Park. Dress for the weather, and once there, explore the town which sits on the edge of the park. It sits within the traditional territory of the Champagne and Aishihik First Nations, Southern Tutchone people who have lived in the area for thousands of years. Visit the Da Kų Cultural Centre before heading off the Kluane. Designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, the park offers an unbelievable Ice Fields experience, weather permitting, and is a significant part of cultural history in the North.

UNTIL NEXT TIME